A Message Sponsored by Los Angeles County
By Dr. Eloisa Gonzalez, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

 Q: Can I get the Pfizer vaccine for my 1st dose and Moderna for my 2nd or vice versa?

A: No. You must get the same type of vaccine for both doses. The efficacy of the vaccine will be impacted if you do not get the same type for both doses.

Q: When do the vaccines start protecting me?

A: You will be fully vaccinated 2 weeks after your second dose for Pfizer or Moderna, or 2 weeks after your single dose of Johnson & Johnson.

In that time period, you should continue to take precautions as if you have not received any doses of the vaccine.

Q: I received my 1st dose but missed my 2nd. Do I need to get the 1st dose again?

A: You should try and get the second dose either 21 days after your first shot if you got the Pfizer vaccine or 28 days if you got the Moderna vaccine.  If you don’t get the second dose within that time frame, get it as soon as possible.  You will not be fully vaccinated if you don’t get both doses.

Q: Can I visit my family, including older relatives, once I have been vaccinated?

A: It depends. Fully vaccinated people can meet indoors with other fully vaccinated people without masks or social distancing.

Fully vaccinated people can also meet with people from one household that are unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated as long as they are not at risk for serious illness from COVID-19. 

Q: Who is eligible to be vaccinated?

A:  Everyone 12 years or older who lives or works in Los Angeles County is now eligible to receive their COVID-19 vaccine.  People under 18 are only able to receive the Pfizer vaccine, per the FDA’s guidance. 

Visit Vaccinatelosangeles.com to make your vaccination appointment.

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