1985

Deng Xiaoping

BY GEORGE J. CHURCH

Jan. 6, 1986

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TIME Person of the Year: Story Archive Since 1927, Deng Xiaoping

http://www.time.com/time/subscriber/personoftheyear/archive/stories/1985.html

“Marx sits up in heaven, and he is very powerful. He sees what we are doing, and he doesn’t like it. So he has punished me by making me deaf.”
— Deng Xiaoping, 1985

The leader of 1 billion Chinese was joking, of course; he lost part of the hearing in one ear long before he launched the world’s most populous nation on an audacious effort to create what amounts almost to a new form of society. But, as might be expected from the diminutive (4 ft. 11 in.), steel-hard Deng, 81, it was a joke with a sharp point. If in his more solemn moments he still attempts to justify what he often calls his “second revolution” in the name of that patron saint of Communist revolution, Karl Marx, Deng is well aware that the system he is evolving in China either ignores or defies many of the precepts most cherished by traditional Marxists (especially those running the Soviet Union). In the Chinese spirit of balance between yin and yang, Deng’s second revolution is an attempt on a monumental scale to blend seemingly irreconcilable elements: state ownership and private property, central planning and competitive markets, political dictatorship and limited economic and cultural freedom. Indeed, it is almost, or so it often seems to skeptics in both the Western and Marxist worlds, an attempt to combine Communism and capitalism.

1978

Teng Hsiao-p’ing

FROM THE TIME ARCHIVE

Jan. 1, 1979

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TIME Person of the Year: Story Archive Since 1927, Teng Hsiao-p’ing

http://www.time.com/time/subscriber/personoftheyear/archive/stories/1978.html

The project is vast, daring, and unique in history. How could there be a precedent for turning 1 billion people so sharply in their course, for leading one-quarter of mankind quickstep out of dogmatic isolation into the late 20th century and the life of the rest of the planet? The People’s Republic of China, separated so long from the outer world by an instinctive xenophobia and an admixture of reclusive Maoism, in 1978 began its Great Leap Outward, or what Peking’s propagandists call the New Long March. The Chinese, their primitive economy threadbare and their morale exhausted by the years of Mao Tse-tung’s disastrous Cultural Revolution, hope to have arrived by the year 2000 at a state of relative modernity, and become a world economic and military power. They may not arrive, or arrive on time, but their setting off is an extraordinary spectacle of national ambition.


Discovering China: Movers & Shakers http://library.thinkquest.org/26469/movers-and-shakers/deng.htm

1985

Deng Xiaoping

BY GEORGE J. CHURCH

Jan. 6, 1986

pastedGraphic.pdf

TIME Person of the Year: Story Archive Since 1927, Deng Xiaoping

http://www.time.com/time/subscriber/personoftheyear/archive/stories/1985.html

“Marx sits up in heaven, and he is very powerful. He sees what we are doing, and he doesn’t like it. So he has punished me by making me deaf.”
— Deng Xiaoping, 1985

The leader of 1 billion Chinese was joking, of course; he lost part of the hearing in one ear long before he launched the world’s most populous nation on an audacious effort to create what amounts almost to a new form of society. But, as might be expected from the diminutive (4 ft. 11 in.), steel-hard Deng, 81, it was a joke with a sharp point. If in his more solemn moments he still attempts to justify what he often calls his “second revolution” in the name of that patron saint of Communist revolution, Karl Marx, Deng is well aware that the system he is evolving in China either ignores or defies many of the precepts most cherished by traditional Marxists (especially those running the Soviet Union). In the Chinese spirit of balance between yin and yang, Deng’s second revolution is an attempt on a monumental scale to blend seemingly irreconcilable elements: state ownership and private property, central planning and competitive markets, political dictatorship and limited economic and cultural freedom. Indeed, it is almost, or so it often seems to skeptics in both the Western and Marxist worlds, an attempt to combine Communism and capitalism.

Deng Xiaoping – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deng_Xiaoping

Deng Xiaoping pastedGraphic.pdf listen (help·info) (simplified Chinese: 邓小平; traditional Chinese: 鄧小平; pinyin: Dèng XiǎopíngWade-Giles: Teng Hsiao-p’ing; 22 August 1904  – 19 February 1997) was a Chinese politician, statesman, theorist, and diplomat.[1] As leader of the Communist Party of China, Deng became a reformer who led China towards a market economy. While Deng never held office as the head of state or the head of government, he nonetheless served as the Paramount leader of the People’s Republic of China from 1978 to the early 1990s.

Born into a farming background in Guang’an, Sichuan, Deng studied and worked abroad in France in the 1920s, where he would come under the influence of Marxism. He joined the Communist Party of China in 1923. Upon his return to China he worked as a political commissar in rural regions and was considered a “revolutionary veteran” of the Long March.[2] Following the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, Deng worked in Tibet and other southwestern regions to consolidate Communist control. He was also instrumental in China’s economic reconstruction following the Great Leap Forward in the early 1960s. His economic policies came to odds with the political ideologies of Chairman Mao Zedong. As a result, he would be purged twice during the Cultural Revolution but regained prominence in 1978 by outmaneuvering Mao’s chosen successor, Hua Guofeng.

Inheriting a country wrought with social and institutional woes left over from the Cultural Revolution and other mass political movements of the Mao era, Deng became the core of the “second generation” of Chinese leadership. He is called “the architect” of a new brand of socialist thinking, having developed Socialism with Chinese characteristics and led Chinese economic reform through a synthesis of theories that became known as the “socialist market economy“. Deng opened China to foreign investment, the global market, and limited private competition. He is generally credited with advancing China into becoming one of the fastest growing economies in the world and vastly raising the standard of living.[3]

TIME Magazine | 60 Years of Asian Heroes: Deng Xiaoping

http://www.time.com/time/asia/2006/heroes/nb_deng.html

CNN In-Depth Specials – Visions of China – Profiles: Deng Xiaoping

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/1999/china.50/inside.china/profiles/deng.xiaoping/

TIME Magazine | 60 Years of Asian Heroes: Deng Xiaoping

INST OF INT’L STUDIES, UC BERKELEY’S HOST KREISLER  INTERVIEWED JIM FALLOWS OF ATLANTIC JOURNAL

YouTube – Conversations With History: China and the United States

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBUZaaq6whM&feature=related

Host Harry Kreisler welcomes James Fallows of the Atlantic Monthly for a conversation on U.S-China relations. They discuss the rise of China as a manufacturing superpower, the costs and benefits of economic interdependence between the two countries, and the implications of the relationship for global economic stability. Fallows also talks about the lack of media coverage of the international context of the U.S. financial crisis and speculates on how China will impact the agenda of the next President of the United States. Series:

AL JAZEERA:

YouTube – World economy banks on China – 24 October 2008

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AYSdJgXnWY&feature=channel

AL JAZEERA

YouTube – Riding China’s reforms to riches – 18 Dec 08

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfoMUB5lYEo&feature=related

China is marking 30 years since Deng Xiaoping opened the country to market reforms.

Al Jazeera’s Melissa Chan reports from one village which turned what Deng called “socialism with Chinese characteristics” into a multi-billion dollar industry.

VOA VIDEO:

YouTube – China Marks 30 Years of Economic Progress

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7AN2D9WISs&feature=related

China is marking 30 years since it began economic reforms that have lifted millions out of poverty and made Chine one of the world’s fastest-growing nations.

But, those advances have not come without a price. Lax environmental protection has also made China one of the most world’s polluted countries and a growing income gap now threatens social stability. Daniel Schearf reports for VOA.

VOA VIDEO:

YouTube – Rapid Recovery Seen For China

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS8WHkSA3BE&feature=channel

CCTV VIDEO:

YouTube – Deng XiaoPing – Project

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu5C4TYmahY

YouTube – 1978 – The turning point in Chinese economy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16LoggLkDCg&feature=related


YouTube – China 30 years: Private economy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LibqDwg4DFE&NR=1

YouTube – China: 30 years of change

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMTNNe1a9iY&feature=related

DENG XIAO PING REVIEWED  ‘84 PARADE

YouTube – 1984 China National Day PARADE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jF9SKqwdU4

1984 was a year of new beginnings for China.

After 25 years of interruption, the national day military parade was finally restored, thanks to Deng Xiaoping ,who became Chinas leader, shortly after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976. The year marked the 35th anniversary of the founding of New China.

The long awaited parade began with Deng Xiaoping, standing on an inspection car, and reviewing the formations. He then gave a speech from the Tiananmen Tower.

As the march began.,42 square arrays of more than 10 thousand soldiers proudly marched past Tiananmen square .With all eyes on China, it was the perfect time to show off Chinas new types of domestically produced weapons, 28 categories of weaponry made their debut at the parade, 19 of which were at a world-class level.

What was new about the formation that year, was the addition of armed police forces and female soldiers.,

1984 also marks an unforgettable moment in China’s history,because this was the first parade after the introduction of China’s reform and opening up policy in 1976.

After Maos death, Deng Xiaoping slowly regained prominence after being persecuted during the Cultural Revolution, and became the vice chairman of the Communist party.

YouTube – Chinese Military Parade (1984)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YJY2YSptLk&feature=related


YouTube – Chinese army girls in 1984, 1999, 2009 y

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uj_1yGlLwOU

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