Suu Kyi Signals Shift in Sanctions Stance


Suu Kyi Signals Shift in Stance on Sanctions – WSJ.com


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703670004575616350526879676.html?mod=WSJ_hp_MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsFifth


A top item on the agenda of Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi after seven years of house arrest is her stance on Western sanctions against Myanmar’s military regime, and she has indicated she may be revising her thinking.

Whether that means she may throw her weight behind calls to repeal the sanctions may remain unclear for a while as she settles into a new work routine after her release Saturday….

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi seeks to revive political party – Yahoo! News

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101116/ap_on_re_as/as_myanmar_suu_kyi

YANGON, Myanmar – Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyibegan the nuts and bolts work of reviving her political movement Monday, consulting lawyers about having her now-disbanded party declared legal again.

Suu Kyi was released over the weekend from 7 1/2 years in detention. On Sunday, she told thousands of wildly cheering supporters at the headquarters of her National League for Democracy that she would continue to fight for human rights and the rule of law in the military-controlled nation.

The 65-year-old Nobel Peace laureate must balance the expectations of the country’s pro-democracy movement with the realities of freedom that could be withdrawn any time by the regime. Although her party is officially dissolved, it has continued operating with the same structure. But without official recognition, it is in legal limbo, leaving it — and her — vulnerable to government crackdowns.

The junta recently staged Myanmar’s first elections in 20 years, and in a step that will blunt some of the long-standing international criticism of its conduct, released Suu Kyi a week later. Having made those ostensible moves toward democratization after five decades of military rule, it is unlikely to make more concessions — like restoring theNLD’s legal status — without getting something back from Suu Kyi and her party, such as dropping its support for Western sanctions.

Suu Kyi, who has been detained for 15 of the past 21 years, has indicated she would continue with her political activity but not whether she would challenge the military with mass rallies and other activities. She has been noncommittal on sanctions, saying that she would support lifting them if the people of Myanmar provided strong justification for doing so.

In an interview Monday with the BBC, Suu Kyi said she sought “a nonviolent revolution” and offered some reassuring words for the military.

“I don’t want to see the military falling. I want to see the military rising to dignified heights of professionalism and true patriotism,” she said.

The British-educated Suu Kyi also said she did not fear being detained again.

“I’m not scared,” she said. “I know that there is always a possibility, of course. They’ve done it back in the past, they might do it again.”….

Freed Myanmar Dissident Urges Reconciliation and Change – NYTimes.com


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/15/world/asia/15myanmar.html?_r=1&ref=world



YANGON, Myanmar — On her first full day of freedom after more than seven years of house arrest, Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, demonstrated the enduring power of her popularity on Sunday, drawing thousands of jubilant supporters to a rally at which she pledged to lead them in a struggle for political change.


Though she spoke of reconciliation, the event itself was a challenge to the authority and control of the ruling military junta.

The size and enthusiasm of the crowd — the kind of outpouring of public support that had led the government to cut short her previous period of freedom in 2003 — suggested that she had emerged with her popularity and moral authority intact.

“Democracy is when the people keep a government in check,” she told the crowd outside her party’s headquarters here in the city once known as Rangoon. “To achieve democracy we need to create a network, not just in our country but around the world. I will try to do that. If you do nothing you get nothing.”

She positioned her movement as an active opposition to the military leaders but gave no specifics, and it was unclear what steps she would take next. She took pains not to be confrontational, leaving open the possibility of a new relationship with the generals who had imprisoned her.

“I’m going to work for national reconciliation. That is a very important thing,” she said, adding: “There is nobody I cannot talk to. I am prepared to talk with anyone. I have no personal grudge toward anybody.”

Nevertheless, she began the new relationship with a flat refusal to cooperate, according to a person close to the negotiations who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

In arranging for her release, that person said, the military had asked her to agree not to leave Yangon and not to give public speeches. When she refused, she was asked at least to wait awhile before speaking. She refused again and proceeded with her address on Sunday.

She spoke with the buoyancy and infectious joy that have characterized her addresses in the past, and her exchanges with the crowd were sometimes emotional.

“I need to know what you want first,” she said to the crowd. “Do you know what you want?”

She pointed to a middle-age man and her aides handed him a microphone. “We love you very much!” the man said. “And we need democracy!”

The microphone was passed to another man in the crowd who shouted wildly, “Today the entire country has been released from military slavery!”

Mrs. Aung San Suu Kyi did not respond or even smile, but only gestured that the microphone be passed to a woman nearby. The woman wept and cried, “I love you more than I love myself.”…

Celebrations over, Myanmar’s Suu Kyi goes to work reviving her political movement – latimes.com


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/wire/sns-ap-as-myanmar-suu-kyi,0,7388843.story


YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi began the nuts and bolts work of reviving her political movement Monday, consulting lawyers about having her now-disbanded party declared legal again.


Suu Kyi was released over the weekend from 7 1/2 years in detention. On Sunday, she told thousands of wildly cheering supporters at the headquarters of her National League for Democracy that she would continue to fight for human rights and the rule of law in the military-controlled nation.

The 65-year-old Nobel Peace laureate must balance the expectations of the country’s pro-democracy movement with the realities of freedom that could be withdrawn any time by the regime. Although her party is officially dissolved, it has continued operating with the same structure. But without official recognition, it is in legal limbo, leaving it — and her — vulnerable to government crackdowns.


The junta recently staged Myanmar’s first elections in 20 years, and in a step that will blunt some of the long-standing international criticism of its conduct, released Suu Kyi a week later. Having made those ostensible moves toward democratization after five decades of military rule, it is unlikely to make more concessions — like restoring the NLD’s legal status — without getting something back from Suu Kyi and her party, such as dropping opposition to Western sanctions.


Suu Kyi, who has been detained for 15 of the past 21 years, has indicated she would continue with her political activity but not whether she would challenge the military with mass rallies and other activities. She has been noncommittal on sanctions, saying that she would support lifting them if the people of Myanmar provided strong justification for doing so.


In an interview Monday with the BBC, Suu Kyi said she sought “a nonviolent revolution” and offered some reassuring words for the military.


“I don’t want to see the military falling. I want to see the military rising to dignified heights of professionalism and true patriotism,” she said.

The British-educated Suu Kyi also said she did not fear being detained again.


“I’m not scared,” she said. “I know that there is always a possibility, of course. They’ve done it back in the past, they might do it again.”

Nyan Win, who is her lawyer as well as a party spokesman, said Suu Kyi met with her lawyers Monday morning and also party officials from areas outside Yangon who have been keeping her political network alive during years of repression.


He said Myanmar’s High Court this Thursday will hold a hearing to decide whether to accept a case from Suu Kyi arguing that her party’s dissolution “is not in accordance with the law.” The party was disbanded earlier this year under a new law because it failed to reregister for Nov. 7 elections, complaining conditions set by the junta were unfair and undemocratic.


Suu Kyi’s side says the new Election Commission has no right to deregister parties that were registered under a different Election Commission in 1990. The party also contends that the court is legally bound to hear their case.


Asia Times Online :: Southeast Asia news and business from Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam


http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/LK16Ae03.html

YANGON – Monday was an extraordinary day in the office for Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s newly freed democracy icon, as she set about rebuilding her weakened party and taking the first steps toward national reconciliation.


Smiling as she arrived at the National League for Democracy (NLD) headquarters in Yangon, all eyes were focused on the tasks Suu Kyi, fresh from release from house arrest, faces to heal deep divisions and unite the political opposition. She said on Sunday she was willing to meet Senior General Than Shwe, leader of Myanmar’s junta, to talk through their differences…


Asia Times Online :: Southeast Asia news and business from Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam


http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/LK16Ae02.html


While Myanmar’s generals held their stage-managed elections, an ethnic rebel group forcibly seized control of two border towns and highlighted immediately the polls’ ineffectiveness at achieving national reconciliation.


Government forces on Tuesday forced the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA) out of Myawaddy and Pyathounzu towns, but the attacks already had significant repercussions for the transition from military to civilian rule.


DKBA troops of the 902nd Battalion under Lieutenant Colonel Kyaw Thet entered Myawaddy on Sunday afternoon, the day of the elections, and took over government offices, including a police station and the local headquarters of Military Affairs Security (MAS), Myanmar’s military intelligence agency. Colonel Lah Pweh, the leader of the DKBA’s 5th Brigade, claimed it was necessary to intervene to protect people from being forced to vote by the military.

Lah Pweh’s motives, however, were apparently more calculated, according to Karen sources familiar with the situation. Realizing that the DKBA would likely be attacked for its refusal to join the government’s new Border Guard Force (BGF) units, which as proposed require ethnic armies to cede control of their arms and soldiers to the Myanmar military, he seized the initiative while international attention was focused on the country…..


Suu Kyi to Myanmar junta: ‘Let’s meet and talk’ – World news – Asia-Pacific – msnbc.com


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40176738/ns/world_news-asiapacific/


YANGON, Myanmar — Pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi called on Sunday for freedom of speech in army-ruled Myanmar, urged thousands of supporters to stand up for their rights, and indicated she may urge the West to end sanctions.

Suu Kyi’s first major speech since being freed from seven years of house arrest a day earlier left little doubt she would resume an influential political role in one of the world’s most isolated and oppressive countries.


“The basis of democratic freedom is freedom of speech,” she said to roaring cheers from thousands of supporters crammed into a cordoned-off street in front of her party’s headquarters. “Even if you are not political, politics will come to you.”


The 65-year-old Nobel peace laureate, who had lost none of her ability to rouse and mesmerize crowds, offered an olive branch to the military junta, saying she had no antagonism for those who kept her detained for 15 of the past 21 years.


Timeline: Myanmar and Aung San Suu Kyi (on this page)


Asked by a reporter what message she had for supreme leader Senior General Than Shwe, she replied, “let’s meet and talk.” The two last met in secret talks in 2002 at the encouragement of the United Nations.


Highlights of Aung San Suu Kyi’s Speech: « democracy for burma


http://democracyforburma.wordpress.com/2010/11/14/highlights-of-aung-san-suu-kyis-speech/


Highlights of Aung San Suu Kyi’s Speech:


—“I will continue my efforts to bring about national reconciliation, and I need the support of our people,” said Suu Kyi.


—“I’ve always believed in national reconciliation. I believe in human rights and the rule of law,” said Suu Kyi.


—”I have no grudge against my captors,” said Suu Kyi.


—“Democracy is a system which allows the majority of people to guide a small group of people in power,” Suu Kyi said.


—“If we want something, we must dare to do it, have the capacity to do it, and we have to be efficient in doing it,” said Suu Kyi.


—“If we use our strength in the right way, nobody can break it,” said Suu Kyi.


—“Politics is important for all people. Don’t consider it’s not your affair,” said Suu Kyi.


—“Courage means to work for what you believe with perseverance and to be strong and to have good will. It’s not courageous to use one’s physical strength and to shout loudly,” said Suu Kyi.


—Suu Kyi said she will work with all the people, including democratic forces, to achieve national reconciliation. “I have no intention of going my own way,” she said.


—Suu Kyi avoided the sensitive topic of election vote fraud in her first public speech.

(See unofficial translated transcript of Speech)

More Videos

YouTube – Aung San Suu Kyi Speech (Part 1)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKPQPJqXUUI


YouTube – Aung San Suu Kyi Speech (Part 2)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5WiHIH8S8o&feature=related


YouTube – Aung San Suu Kyi Speech (Part 3)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5DSQyP_npI&feature=related


YouTube – Aung San Suu Kyi Speech (Part 4)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-4go7NDzSY&feature=related


YouTube – aung san suu kyi speech (15/11/10)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHBq9mAs4fI


YouTube – Aung San Suu Kyi Release Speech 14 Nov 2010



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMrReorfpBE


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